Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! (Two if you don’t count the water, and one if you don’t count the lemon juice to prevent browning.)

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

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If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce. It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren’t in season.

What kind of apples should I use?

I’ve made applesauce using honeycrisp, gala and golden delicious. You will end up with yummy applesauce using any kind of “saucing apples” which are sweeter because of the higher natural sugar content. (I recommend staying away from tart apples, like granny smith. However, you can use them if you do a 2:1 ratio with sweeter apples.)

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

How many apples am I going to need?

It totally depends on how much applesauce you want to make! I’ve bought an entire box of apples and made giant batches. I’ve made smaller batches with apples that are on the verge of going bad because we bought too many and I don’t want them to go to waste. That’s really the beauty of applesauce. You can make as much, or as little, as you want. I’ve included a chart at the bottom of this post that will help you get an idea of how many apples you’ll need for the amount of applesauce you want to make.

Let’s get started!

First, you’ll need to peel, core and slice your apples. I have a handy little apple peeler we’ve had for years that I love because it does all three things at the same time, which is a huge time-saver. (You can choose to leave the skins on if you want but make sure to scrub your apples really well to prevent contamination and know that the color of the applesauce might not be a nice yellow if you do.)

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

As each apple is peeled, cored and sliced, I put them into a large bowl with clean water and lemon juice. The lemon juice is totally optional. I just like my applesauce to stay more yellow and the lemon juice helps prevent browning. Once your bowl is full, you can take the apples and slice them into smaller pieces and put them into a large pot. I have a couple of 5-6 quart pots I use. Even though my apple peeler also slices my apples, I like to cut the pieces a little smaller so I can fit more into my pot.

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

Add 1-1 1/2 cups of water to the pot with the apples and turn on the burner. (You don’t need very much water because as the apples cook down, they will naturally release their juices. The water on the bottom helps prevent burning until the juices are released.)

Using a wooden spoon, I scoop the apples on the bottom and bring them up to the top so they all cook more evenly. I’ve noticed it takes about 10 minutes for the apples to cook through. You’ll notice that they become translucent (semi see through) when they are done. If you’re still not sure, scoop out a piece of apple, let it cool and take a bite. If it’s still crunchy, let it go for a bit longer. You don’t need to worry about all the apples being completely cooked through because in the next step, you’ll be blending them and that will take care of any less-cooked pieces.

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

While the apples are cooking, I set up my bottling station. I put a dish towel down on the counter next to the stove and put my quart jars on top. The lids go in a small pot on the stove with enough water to cover them and I turn the burner on low to warm them up. This is an important step because heating the lids softens the rubber on them so they create a better seal on the jar once you put the ring on.

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

I also get out my blender and another dish towel. (I have a Blendtec which I absolutely love and use all the time.)

Other helpful (although not necessary) tools I use are: metal tongs (to pull the lids out of the water) and a wide-mouth funnel (to help prevent spills).

When the apples are done cooking, I turn the burner to low and scoop them into my blender. I like to use a small handheld metal strainer because it gets a lot of apples at once and leaves the juice behind (for now). If you have a larger blender jar, you should be able to fill it to the 4.5-5 cup line, which will give you about 4 cups of applesauce (perfect for filling one quart jar).

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

Before you blend, add 1/2-3/4 cup apple juice from the pot into your blender jar. Put the lid on your blender, making sure to leave it vented. My Blendtec lid has an opening in the top that I just leave open and cover with a dish towel to prevent splatter. The apples are going to be super, super hot, so please don’t forget to do this step or you could get burned or possibly break your blender jar.

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

Turn on the blender. The longer you blend your applesauce, the smoother it will be. I usually let it go for about 30 seconds on speed 3. Turn off the blender, carefully remove the lid and pour directly into your jar. Use your tongs to pull a lid out of the simmering water, put it on top of the jar, put a ring on and tighten it. The jar will be hot so I recommend using a silicone hot pad to prevent burning your hand.

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

The last step is to process it in either a water bath canner or a steam canner. (I prefer the steam canner because it uses so much less water and it heats up faster.) Whether you use a pint or a quart jar, you’ll need to process it for 20 minutes. Start the timer when the water is boiling (for a water bath) or when you see a steady stream of steam coming out of the steam canner. When the time is up, carefully remove the jars from the canner and turn them upside down on a dish towel. The jars should have sealed while in the canner, but keeping them upside down until they are cool will help any that didn’t seal.

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

**NOTE** Processing is when you boil the jars and food inside them to help kill off any bacteria that might be present. It also helps seal the lid and preserve the food you just bottled.

When the jars are cool, turn them over and press in the middle of the lid. If it pops up, the jar didn’t seal properly and you’ll need to either try and reprocess it, or just put in the fridge and eat it within the next week or so. If it doesn’t pop up, the jar is sealed and your beautiful homemade applesauce can be stored for a couple of years in a cool, dry place until you’re ready to eat it!

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

Speaking of using it, you can use your homemade applesauce to make these delicious applesauce muffins! Our family loves them for an on-the-go breakfast, after school snack or even with dinner. And they are ready from bowl to plate in 20 minutes! Can’t go wrong there. *wink*


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Homemade Applesauce

Make homemade applesauce and then bottle it to have the fresh taste of apples all year long.

Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Processing Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 quarts

Ingredients

  • 10-12 lbs apples
  • 6 c water
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 Tbsp cinnamon (optional)

Instructions

  1. First, you’ll need to peel, core and slice your apples.

  2. As each apple is peeled, cored and sliced, put them into a large bowl with clean water and lemon juice. The lemon juice is optional and just prevents browning. Once your bowl is full, you can take the apples and slice them into smaller pieces and put them into a large pot (5-6 qts).

  3. Add 1-1 1/2 cups of water to the pot with the apples and turn on the burner. (You don’t need very much water because as the apples cook down, they will naturally release their juices. The water on the bottom helps prevent burning until the juices are released.)

  4. Using a wooden spoon, scoop the apples on the bottom and bring them up to the top so they all cook more evenly. It takes about 10 minutes for the apples to cook through. You’ll notice that they become translucent (semi see through) when they are done. If you’re still not sure, scoop out a piece of apple, let it cool and take a bite. If it’s still crunchy, let it go for a bit longer.

  5. While the apples are cooking, set up your bottling station. Put a dish towel down on the counter next to the stove and put the jars on top. The lids go in a small pot on the stove with enough water to cover them.  Turn the burner on low to warm them up.

  6. When the apples are done cooking, turn the burner to low and scoop them into the blender. (I like to use a small handheld metal strainer.)  If you have a larger blender jar, you should be able to fill it to the 4.5-5 cup line, which will give you about 4 cups of applesauce (perfect for filling one quart jar).

  7. Before you blend, add 1/2-3/4 cup apple juice from the pot into your blender jar. Put the lid on your blender, making sure to leave it vented.  The apples are going to be super, super hot, so please don’t forget to do this step or you could get burned or possibly break your blender jar.

  8. Turn on the blender. The longer you blend your applesauce, the smoother it will be. (I usually let it go for about 30 seconds on speed 3.) Turn off the blender, carefully remove the lid and pour directly into your jar. Use your tongs to pull a lid out of the simmering water, put it on top of the jar, put a ring on and tighten it. The jar will be hot so use a silicone hotpad to prevent burning your hand.

  9. The last step is to process it in either a water bath canner or a steam canner. (I prefer the steam canner because it uses so much less water and it heats up faster.) Whether you use a pint or a quart jar, you’ll need to process it for 20 minutes. Start the timer when the water is boiling (for a water bath) or when you see a steady stream of steam coming out of the steam canner. When the time is up, carefully remove the jars from the canner and turn them upside down on a dish towel. The jars should have sealed while in the canner, but keeping them upside down until they are cool will help any that didn’t seal.

  10. When the jars are cool, turn them over and press in the middle of the lid. If it pops up, the jar didn’t seal properly and you’ll need to either try and reprocess it, or just put in the fridge and eat it within the next week or so. If it doesn’t pop up, the jar is sealed and your beautiful homemade applesauce can be stored for a couple of years in a cool, dry place until you’re ready to eat it!

Check out the chart below to determine how many apples you’ll need to make the amount of applesauce you want to bottle.

Learning how to bottle homemade applesauce is as simple as 1-2-3, because it literally only takes three ingredients! If you want to get into bottling or canning and you have no idea where to start, I would definitely recommend starting with applesauce.  It requires basic tools you already have at home or could borrow and is a great way to preserve a delicious and healthy food to use later on when apples aren't in season.

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6 Comments

  1. We always keep homemade applesauce on hand for snacking and using in recipes! The applesauce muffins are a great idea and I also sometimes use it as a sub for oil in other baked goods. Thanks for sharing!


  2. I keep saying I am going to start canning and it still hasnt happened. It would be so great to be able to make these type of things like applesauce homemade and in bulk for the family!


  3. I agree, applesauce is a great place to start if you’re new to canning! It really is so much easier than it seems!


  4. This is so helpful! We go apple picking in the fall and I always make a batch of yummy applesauce, but have had no idea how to preserve it. I’m not super skilled at cooking and canning has always seemed tricky, but you’ve made it look totally doable!

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